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AHVAP Unveils the Long-Awaited Value Analysis Courses and CVAHP Certification!

Posted By Jazzy McCroskey, Thursday, November 12, 2015
Updated: Thursday, November 12, 2015

After more than two years of work (1000+ hours!) by dedicated volunteers, AHVAP was proud to unveil the long-awaited Value Analysis Courses and CVAHP certification at their Annual Conference. Owens & Minor University with whom AHVAP contracted to develop our Value Analysis on-line course, distributed CVAHP Handbooks to all and enrolled candidates for on-line courses. Handbooks are available on-line at: http://www.ahvap.org/resource/resmgr/CVAHP/2015CVAHP_Handbook.pdf

AHVAP announced the accomplishment in a press release to Healthcare Purchasing News, a long-time supporter of AHVAP.

If you were not able to attend this year’s conference and do not receive HPN, Click here to view the press release.

One of AHVAP’s foundational strengths is the opportunity for networking with professional peers. If you are a member committed to Healthcare Value Analysis, share the announcement and the opportunity with your peers. Those new to the role are often desperately searching for education now available on-line and a personal recommendation is a powerful message about the value of professional certification.

For more information about the CVAHP Certification and on-line course modules visit the AHVAP website see the links below:

CVAHP Pioneers (received the certification at the 2015 AHVAP conference)
  • Cheri Berri-Lesh
  • Shannon Candio
  • Kathleen Carrico
  • Cindy Christofanelli
  • Colleen Cusick
  • Dee Donatelli
  • Nila Getter
  • Sonja Glass
  • Gloria Graham
  • Robin Howe
  • Lori Kirsch
  • Sue Knapp
  • Jamie Kowalski
  • Robin Lane
  • Wanda Lane
  • Kumbia Lewis
  • Kristie Monroe
  • Joyce Palczewski
  • Laura Polson
  • Beth Potter
  • Ellis Reeder
  • Allison Richins
  • Lois Simpson
  • Robin Starr
  • Barbara Strain
  • Perry Suthar
  • Jennifer Sydnor
  • Peg Tinker
  • Sue Toomey
  • Jane Torzewski
  • Liz Veazey
  • Julie Ware
  • Crickette Young

Tags:  CVAHP Certification  on-line course modules  Owens & Minor University  Pioneers  Value Analysis Courses 

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8 Steps to Looking for a Job Confidentially

Posted By Administration, Monday, October 26, 2015

What to do in your first steps for a career move
As there becomes an increasing demand for Value Analysis Professionals, clinicians specializing in product standardization and utilization can assess how they want to move forward in their careers. 

Here are 8 Steps to looking for a job confidentially.

Keep your departure plans 100% confidential, as this is gossip almost no one can resist. Even if you only tell one co-worker during a mutual whine-fest, you’ve told one person too many.
Management will eventually find out and you’ll be toast just as soon as you can be replaced.
Don’t let anybody suspect that you’re losing interest in your job, or taking time off to meet recruiters and interview. Everything should go on as before. Maintain normal behaviors and performance. Dress the way you’ve always dressed, contribute to meetings what you’ve always contributed, and keep the same hours.
If anything, increase your commitment -- to your boss, your work, to your own professional competency and to your team. Become the ideal professional so you can present at job interviews by supporting your commentary with valid illustrations from current activities.

Decide On a Target Job
Many people think that job change is a good opportunity to get a promotion. Sometimes this is possible, but mostly it is not. People get hired based on their credentials, not on their potential, while the majority of promotions come from a current employer where skills are already known.
You’ll typically need at least 75% of the required skills for a job to land an interview and to be seriously considered as a candidate. Your most realistic strategy is to pursue a job similar to the one you have now, but that offers different opportunities more in tune with your goals.

Upgrade Your Skills
Surfing for potential job options also helps you determine if there are in-demand skills that you are lacking. Your renewed enthusiasm and commitment at work puts you in a perfect position to pursue training and projects that will build these needed skills and enhance your marketability, while simultaneously becoming more valuable in your current job.

Define Your Sales Message
Probably the most financially important document you will ever own is your resume. It is the key that opens the doors of professional opportunity. Be witty in your sales message.
You need to learn how to write one a resume that captures a carefully defined sales message within a succinctly written story focused on a specific target job before starting your job search.

Build Your Professional Networks
If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile you should create one. If you have a profile, update it to reflect consistent messaging between your resume and social media profile.
Begin expanding your professional networks by connecting to everyone with whom you have worked. Then, join the LinkedIn special interest groups that are relevant to your job and profession. With these groups you are looking for a membership that reflects your job title as well as the job titles one, two and three levels above yours, and finally, those titles with which yours interacts on a regular basis.

This will help you to build a professional network optimally focused to help you land that next step on your path with minimal noise.

Manage Your Emotions
You cross an emotional bridge when you make the decision to move on, and there is often a temptation to make your workspace less personal as a visual reminder that this is no longer your home. However, you should keep everything normal.
Don’t pack up your photographs or other personalization of your workspace. Keep everything as it is until you achieve your goal, have accepted a new job, have the offer in writing and have formally resigned.

Find a Recruiter
Find a Recruiter who understands your background and interests, so that you can pick and choose the specific jobs that best fit your needs and qualifications.  A recruiter who says they recruit in all areas and doesn’t have a specific niche is probably not going to be your best avenue.  They don’t understand what you do and don’t have the knowledge base to market your skills. 

Jessica Bellew
Managing Partner
Code Bellew Healthcare Recruiters
281 600-8132
jbellew@codebellew.com

Tags:  8 steps  careers  Code Bellew Healthcare Recruiters  Jessica Bellew  jobs 

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Standardization of PPI items....HOW do you achieve?

Posted By Administration, Monday, September 14, 2015

AHVAP Regional Webinar Hosted by the Central Region

Our thanks to Kumbia Lewis, AHVAP, Central Region Director for another educational webinar!  Kumbia along with the team from Indiana University Health, Dennis Mullins, VP Supply Chain Operations, Design & Construction; Linda York, Director of Contracting and Value Analysis Supply Chain Operations; and Carli O’Beirn, Executive Director Supply Chain Operations provided participants with a step-by-step account of their experience in establishing a capitated contract for cardiac stents.
Linda York began the presentation with a high-level overview of Indiana University Health.  With 29,000 employees at 19 hospitals in 15 communities, IU Health is the second-largest employer in the state.  Linda went on to explain the structure of their System Value Analysis Team which consists of eight teams and four councils.  The teams have been in existence for several years.  The councils, established within the last four years, are aligned along service lines, and include both physicians and clinicians.  Both the Value Analysis teams and the Councils are focused on value analysis.

Whether you establish a value analysis charter or a standard operating procedure, in order to operate effectively and produce measureable outcomes, the team must define their purpose, identify their objective, and determine their strategy.  These were the steps the IU Health team followed when they began working with their Cardiologists three years ago.  Physicians acknowledged that stents are essentially a commodity item.  The team’s objective was to normalize costs for bare metal and drug eluting stents.  The stakeholders convened to develop their strategy and their message, establish a pricing structure, then met with the suppliers with an invitation to participate. Suppliers were given a deadline to accept the offer to participate.

Throughout the process, physicians were fully supportive of the strategy. Linda said they “played hardball” when it came to interactions with the Suppliers.  One supplier refused to participate and as a result was excluded as an approved vendor for this product line.  Most recently, with the introduction of a new technology, the supplier attempted to meet independently with physicians.  The physicians maintained their position, emphasized their support for the contracting process and informed the Supplier they would not deviate from the current contract. Support from the stakeholders was essential for the success of the team effort.
The IU Health team shared valuable tips and insights into their experience in establishing a capitated price for cardiac stents.  Our thanks to Kumbia, Linda, Dennis, and Carli for their time and effort. 

If you were unable to attend the webinar, Hayes Inc. has recorded this session for AHVAP.  A link to the recording has been posted on the Members Only, Resource Library, in the Webinar Archives section.

Tags:  Carli O'Beirn  Central Region  Dennis Mullins  Indiana University Health  IU Health team  Kumbia Lewis  Linda York  PPI items  webinar 

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Relationships with Revenue Integrity Teams and the partnership with VA’s

Posted By Administration, Friday, September 11, 2015

Providence Health & Services has recognized the need to look at both reimbursement and total cost of procedure. This is new for our value analysis process.  It has always been difficult to find who had the information and even who we should ask. It was rarely information that was included in our product request and procedural review, but information we recognized as needed. One region may have found a resource but there was no connectivity to other regions in role, title, department, or scope of work. Thus no transferability from one region to another.

We have been in a transition from Regional Value Analysis to a System Value Management process over the last several years. This journey encompassed many other system areas such as nursing, human resources, and revenue cycle to name a few. A Chief, Strategic Business Analytics and a Chief Reimbursement Officer have recently been named with whom we can work. This work is just beginning with meetings set up to discuss our collaboration…so our journey begins with great excitement!

The dream: To be able to justify the increase in Supply costs upon which supply chain gets measured with the strategies that Nursing is being charged with along with the cost of items that physicians request that increases those costs. We keep getting asked to cut and caregivers keep adding. It is not really a “we” “they” scenario because we all want what is best for the patient and the community and we do work well with all the caregivers. The work is in how to tie the cost and outcomes together for the total financial benefit.

By Tanya Rice, RN, MSN, Director Clinical Value Analysis Services for Providence Health and Services

Tanya Rice RN MSN, Director Clinical Value Analysis Services for Providence Health and Services. Experience in perioperative and NICU nursing. Multiple years in value analysis and experience in industry as a consultant and sales representative. Currently leading a fabulous team of five VA Managers and four VA Coordinators that manage the value analysis process at Providence Health & Service, a 34 hospital system on the west coast.

Tags:  Analytics  Integrity  Providence Health and Services  Relationship  Supply Costs  Tayna Rice  Teams  transition  VA 

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AHVAP Video

Posted By Administration, Thursday, August 20, 2015

Tags:  ahvap  video  youtube 

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Meet August’s Member of the Month: Wanda Lane

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 19, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Wanda’s favorite element about AHVAP is NETWORKING! She says, “When I began in the field, I had no idea what I was doing. AHVAP was rich with friendly people who were willing to share their experiences and take me under their wing.”

What’s one thing personal you’re willing to share?

I am blessed to be the wife of an amazing man, the mom of three teenagers, bonus-mom to three adults and nana to two grandchildren! I speak at events as an advocate for families of addicts and am in the process of writing a book outlining five steps to protecting yourself, your children, and your financial future when married to an addict.  I feel extremely blessed to have survived the ordeal and emerge as an advocate for a forgotten group.

3 professional or personal accomplishments?

  • Set up the value analysis program for a 400 bed safety net hospital, and developed a robust vendor claim validation method using quasi-experimental design.  
  • Written and presented programs on Generational Culture and Diversity, Communication, and Merging Science and Supply Chain.
  • Completing the coursework for my doctorate was incredible! The dissertation process is daunting, but fun.  

Tags:  ahvap  member of the month  Wanda Lane 

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Exploring the Generational Culture Concept

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 18, 2015


By Wanda Lane, RN, MaED, Clinical Value Analysis Manager, Regional One Health

Generation

Birth Years

Generational Characteristics

Political\Social Influencers

Traditionalists

1925-1945

  • Loyal
  • Risk Adverse
  • Team Players
  • Strong respect for authority
  • Struggle with communication technology
  • Great Depression
  • World War II

Baby Boomers

1946-1964

  • Higher priority given to work over family
  • Optimistic
  • Risk Takers
  • Distrust authority
  • Generally resist communication technology
  • Civil Rights movement
  • Vietnam
  • Great Recession\ Hyperinflation economy

Generation X

1965-1980

  • Higher priority given to family over work
  • Adaptive
  • Independent
  • Openly question authority
  • Adapt to traditional or electronic communication
  • Technology explosion
  • Latchkey syndrome*
  • Economic Boom or “Wall Street” economy

Millennials

1980-1995

  • Higher priority given to friends over work
  • Optimistic
  • Strong team influence
  • Require ample feedback from authority
  • Entitled
  • Prefer communication technology
  • Technology immersion
  • Helicopter parents
  • Everyone gets a trophy syndrome*
  • Dotcom economy
  • Pre & post 911 cohorts

NetGens

 

 

©Lane2015

After 1996

  • Highly networked
  • Problem solvers
  • Fiercely Independent
  • Tech intuitive
  • Creative
  • Altruistic
  • Post 911 culture
  • Terrorism
  • Poor economy
  • Bitter political divisiveness
  • Social Networking

Diversity has been a business buzzword for the past couple of decades regarding race, ethnicity, and gender; however, a relatively new concept is moving to the forefront.  Generational culture is a concept that is beginning to seep into the diversity conversation. Webster defines culture as-

  • the beliefs, customs, arts, etc., of a particular society, group, place, or time
  • the customary beliefs, social forms, and material traits of a racial, religious, or social group; also:  the characteristic features of everyday existence (as diversions or a way of life) shared by people in a place or time

Applying this definition to the behaviors of the five generations sharing work space, it becomes clear that generational culture must be accepted as a diversity element and addressed by leadership.

The four primary workplace generations have been Traditionalists (born 1925-1945), Baby Boomers (1946-1964), Generation X’ers (1965- 1980), and Millennials (1981- 1995). They have established traits and stereotypical behaviors that are readily accepted and “managed” in the workplace; however, the conversation typically focuses on differences and conflict opportunity. The newest generation entering the workplace is the NetGen generation. They are the youngest of the group, and in some ways the best prepared for the dynamic political and technological future.

The key to understanding generational diversity is to change the conversation to one of generational culture.  The definition of culture assigns groups of people beliefs, customs, social behaviors, and acceptable norms. Each generation has been shaped by the political and economic events of the times. Traditionalists were raised by survivors of the great depression and many remember the events leading to World War II. Their culture tends to be very self-sufficient and risk adverse.  Baby Boomers grew up during a time of optimism and re-building following the war. They are hard-working, dedicated to a fault, and place great value on stability. However, they also vividly remember civil rights movements and equality marches of the 60’s. Generation X’ers are the middle generation, sometimes called forgotten because they were the first generation of latchkey kids. They tend to be fiercely protective of personal time and work\life balance. They also became very self-sufficient at a very young age; therefore, they do not deal well with micro-managing or overly needy employees. Millennials are the first generation to be raised by parents who gave them a voice in the family decision-making process. This spills over into the workplace with young employees expecting to be treated as equals from the beginning. They were also the first generation raised in the “everyone gets a trophy” culture; therefore, they expect praise for simply showing up to work. This creates some tension in the workplace if the origin is not readily apparent.

Understanding the cultural aspect to approaching generational diversity deepens the conversation, promotes understanding, and narrows communication gaps in the workplace. To complicate matters further, Baby Boomers, Generation X’ers, and Millennials each have defining moments that led to cohorts of people born before and after the event. For example, and older Baby Boomer who was a young adult during the 1960’s has a much different perception of the civil rights movement than a Boomer born in 1963. An older Gen Xer vividly remembers life before cellphones, computers, and other technologies. Millennials’ dividing event is 9-11. Older Millennials remember the attacks and the fear that swept our nation, younger Millennials have little concept of life before the economic downfall following that day. They have only known life after terrorism preparedness, sluggish economy, and political distrust.

Changing the conversation from one of discussing behaviors to one of cultural differences allows a shift in perspective. Moving focus from annoying behaviors to cultural awareness encourages respect and enhances communication. This change in perspective opens doors to a change in perception and that lays the foundation of respect and teamwork.

Seen Around the Web: Resources and Tips

Tags:  AHVAP  Clinical Value Analysis Manager  Exploring the Generational Culture Concept  Wanda Lane 

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2015 AHVAP Annual Conference and Vendor Showcase Highlights

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 15, 2015

The Conference Subcommittee has been working hard to finalize the schedule for the upcoming conference.  We think we have hit on a winning line up of fabulous and engaging presenters.  We will highlight our speakers in the upcoming newsletters starting with this one. 

Back by popular demand Dr. Jimmy Chung will be our keynote speaker on Wednesday morning.  He will kick off the day sharing information on physician engagement and developing physician leadership roles within Value Analysis and Supply Chain.  Everyone enjoyed Dr. Chung’s presentation last year as he provided  insights into the physician/surgeons’ view of supply chain and how to integrate them into value analysis programs.  This year he will take it to the next step and talk about best practice models as Value Analysis evolves towards full integrated outcome driven, patient-centric processes.

We will close the conference on Friday with the very funny and delightful nurse humorist, Terry M. Foster.  He is an emergency nurse who has spoken all over the country sharing his special brand of humor that will enlighten, inspire and revitalize you.   You will be rolling on the floor and smiling all the way home after his presentation.  We are very excited he can join us and we promise you will not be disappointed.   You will not want to miss this presentation. 

We promise a conference experience like no other.  You will learn something new, you will be entertained, you will make new friends, you will be renewed. 

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The Case Against Value Analysis Committees

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 15, 2015

By Hani N. Elias, JD, MPH Chief Executive Officer, Procured Health

Hospitals and IDNs who are serious about optimizing costs associated with medical products and supplies often see the establishment of physician-led value analysis committees (VACs) as a fundamental requirement. These committees are aimed at addressing two common barriers to reducing wasteful spending: lack of physician engagement and objective decision making criteria. VACs are considered an effective medium for aligning physicians to undertake value-maximizing initiatives, such as rationalizing vendors or establishing utilization guidelines for premium-priced products. VACs vary by hospital on three main dimensions: the type of products reviewed (e.g. single committee vs. category-specific committees, new technology vs. existing spend), participants (e.g. physicians, administrators, etc.), and degree of centralization (e.g. facility, division, or system level). While the structure and success of VACs varies, we have observed three common shortcomings:

  • It is difficult to recruit engaged physicians: While there are physicians at every hospital who are passionate about reducing wasteful spending on medical products and technology, health systems often have a difficult time recruiting a full committee of engaged physicians. The challenge multiples when hospitals establish category-specific committees or when IDNs establish committees at the facility level. 
  • The focus on products could overshadow more impactful waste-reducing strategies: Achieving the highest quality care at the lowest cost requires optimization of several variables. VACs that zoom in on the product-related variable might be missing out on a bigger opportunity that lies elsewhere, such as aligning physicians around a practice guideline to reduce infection rates, improving operational efficiency in the OR, or expanding a service line. 
  • Despite the best intentions, VAC agendas are dominated by new product requests: While the primary objective for establishing a VAC was to optimize spend, the VAC agenda is often dominated by the review of new product requests. Rigorously analyzing new product requests is certainly necessary to ensure your hospital is not wasting resources on a product that doesn't yield benefit, but unlocking savings requires a concerted effort at reviewing existing spend. The typical  VAC is a multi-specialty committee, with each major specialty being represented by one physician. While approving or rejecting a new product can be handled by such a group, changing ingrained behavior requires far broader physician engagement.

Rather than creating a new VAC structure, a growing number of health systems, including Academic Medical Centers, for-profit IDNs, and not-for-profit systems, are including supply spend review as part of a broader agenda to optimize care delivery.  This approach addresses the inherent challenges of the VAC structure.
As discussed in HFMA's recently published e-book on "Strategies for Supply Chain Success," Saint Luke's Health System, a 10-facility IDN serving the Kansas City, MO region, supply chain teamed up with Saint Luke's Care, a volunteer physician quality organization to tackle several high cost categories, such as orthopedics. Saint Luke's Care had established "Evidence-Based Practice Teams" to investigate quality improvement opportunities, implement system-wide care pathways, and define order sets. They applied the processes and methodology of those committees to investigate supply spend. Organizations that don't have something analogous to Saint Luke's Care could look to their service line committees as a natural home for supply spend related topics. 

Service line committees are tasked with optimizing clinical outcomes and financial performance. As with supply cost optimization, physician engagement is required to make progress toward these goals. Rather than recruiting a separate group of physicians for a Value Analysis Committee, hospitals can leverage the existing structure and team. Our experience suggests that it's easier to recruit physicians if the mandate of the committee expands beyond products (especially new products). Additionally, the service line structure allows hospitals and physicians to prioritize more effectively. Clinicians are being asked to change several aspects about the way they practice and the service line structure encourages focus on the initiatives that will drive the greatest impact.

Under this model, supply chain plays a primary role in identifying optimization opportunities. Supply chain staff must continually monitor the vendor and product landscape, utilization patterns, and emerging evidence related to product use in order to contribute new ideas. The service line team also relies on supply chain for their product expertise when evaluating the viability of new services, vetting solutions for quality issues, or addressing suboptimal operations. By doing away with VACs, supply chain becomes integrated into the heartbeat of clinical delivery optimization. 

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Wall of Experience – A Call for the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Susan D. Knapp, RN, MS

We have renamed the Wall of Success tradition at our Annual Conference to the Wall of Experience.  We want you to share with us your stories about successful and unsuccessful conversions, negotiations, improvements, etc. These short tantalizing tidbits have been well received at past conferences and people often walk away having learned a little something new.   Everyone has these stories and the Wall of Experience template makes it very easy and effortless to submit. 
The instructions and template have a link on the Annual Conference homepage, http://www.ahvap.org/?page=2015WallofSuccess#wall .  The template is one powerpoint slide and will be printed off for the conference on 8.5” x 11” paper. Only one slide per initiative will be accepted.  And yes, you can submit more than one initiative.  This is open to anyone attending the conference.  Attendees will vote on their favorite and prizes will be given to the top three posters. 
Not sure what to do?  The instructions have some suggestions such as product conversion, standardization, safety initiative, practice, utilization, waste.   You can do anything that pertains to a value analysis project.  Big or small, spectacular success or dazzling failure – it doesn’t matter.  Someone will learn something from it and that is what it is all about. 

Please submit a ‘poster’ to the Wall of Experience.  This is a challenge to you.  You all have so much knowledge and insight.  Please share it with your peers.  Submissions are due by September 1st.  If you have questions or suggestions, contact me at sue_knapp@urmc.rochester.edu .

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